TERROR IN THE NIGHT by Sebastian Blayne (Jan Huckins)

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“A tense, psychological novel of suspense, written in a brittle, sophisticated manner that will keep the reader in a state of fascination.” Pensacola News-Journal

Sebastian “Neddy” Blayne is a flamboyant, wealthy, pampered bon vivant… famous playwright, author and a brilliant detective. Blayne is equal parts Nero Wolfe, Simon Templar and Hercule Poirot…and he is aided in his adventures by his bald, Italian valet Beppo, his red-headed secretary Maggie, and his French poodle Misty…and the ever-diligent NYPD homicide detective Simon Fennelley.

But his latest case hits very close to home.

Memo from Maggie to Sebastian Blayne: “I’m going back. I guess I’m too ‘lace curtain Irish stubborn’ to be scared off. You say I have bride’s jitters, but Neddy, I know someone in the dowager house means to kill me. The town will be filled with terror for me and I’ll dread the streets at night. I only hope my murderer isn’t Curt, because that would mean I’m marrying a psychopath. Remember how we used to drink Courvoisier out of the toothbrush glass? Will you miss me Neddy? Your loving secretary, Maggie.”

Is Blayne’s secretary marrying a psychopathic killer? Will Blayne find the answer before she’s dead…or will he be killed first? To find the answer, he will have to face the terror in the night.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

“Sebastian Blayne” was the pseudonym that writer Jan Huckins adopted for two crime novels written in the early 1950s. She was born in 1911 in Oklahoma City, where her parents owned the Huckins Hotel (her mother later jumped to her death from the 8th floor in 1949). She wrote freelance articles for newspapers and magazines and ghost-wrote the scripts (for writer Irma Phillips) for the popular 1942 radio serial Lonely Woman, which she also novelized. In 1959, she co-authored the novel “Face of My Assassin” under her own name with Carolyn Weston. Huckins died in Santa Monica, California in 1981.

HOLIDAY IN HELL by Sebastian Blayne (Jan Huckins)

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Someone wants Moira dead but each horrific attempt, each apparent “accident,” has failed so far…and cost others their lives. But she knows that soon her luck will run out…and the killer, who might even be her own husband, will succeed.

Her only hope was Sebastian Blayne…the flamboyant, wealthy, pampered bon vivant… famous playwright, author and brilliant detective. Blayne is equal parts Nero Wolfe, Simon Templar and Hercule Poirot…and he is aided in his adventures by his bald, Italian valet Beppo, his red-headed secretary Maggie, and his French poodle Misty…and the ever-diligent NYPD homicide detective Simon Fennelley.

This was previously published under the title Gay Ghastly Holiday

“Sebastian Blayne” was the pseudonym for writer Jan Huckins adopted for two crime novels written in the early 1950s. She was born in 1911 in Oklahoma City, where her parents owned the Huckins Hotel (her mother later jumped to her death from the 8th floor in 1949). She wrote freelance articles for newspapers and magazines and ghost-wrote the scripts (for writer Irma Phillips) for the popular 1942 radio serial Lonely Woman, which she also novelized. In 1959, she co-authored the novel “Face of My Assassin” under her own name with Carolyn Weston. Huckins died in Santa Monica, California in 1981.

TWICE THE TERROR: Two Complete Novels by Sebastian Blayne (Jan Huckins)

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Two Complete Novels of Women Facing Unrelenting Terror…. by “Sebastian Blayne,” the brilliant detective and Broadway playwright

HOLIDAY IN HELL

The story of a passion that knew no law…

Every time Moira tried to flee from the past, there was a paralyzing terror, the spectre of evil to torture her. Every loving embrace, every kiss, was under the shadow of death. Someone wanted her dead…each attempt had failed so far, but soon the killer would get it right.

Moira’s only hope is Sebastian “Neddy” Blayne…the flamboyant, wealthy, pampered bon vivant… famous playwright, author and brilliant detective.

Blayne is equal parts Nero Wolfe, Simon Templar and Hercule Poirot…and he is aided in his adventures by his bald, Italian valet Beppo, his red-headed secretary Maggie, and his French poodle Misty…and the ever-diligent NYPD homicide detective Simon Fennelley.

But can he save her…and himself… from a holiday in hell?

This book was previously published under the title Gay Ghastly Holiday

TERROR IN THE NIGHT

“A tense, psychological novel of suspense, written in a brittle, sophisticated manner that will keep the reader in a state of fascination.” Pensacola News-Journal

Memo from Maggie MacMahon: “I’m going back. I guess I’m too ‘lace curtain Irish stubborn’ to be scared off. You say I have bride’s jitters, but Neddy, I know someone in the dowager house means to kill me. The town will be filled with terror for me and I’ll dread the streets at night. I only hope my murderer isn’t Curt, because that would mean I’m marrying a psychopath. Remember how we used to drink Courvoisier out of the toothbrush glass? Will you miss me Neddy? Your loving secretary, Maggie.”

Is Sebastian Blayne’s secretary marrying a psychopathic killer? Will Blayne find the answer before she’s killed…or will he die trying?

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

“Sebastian Blayne” was the pseudonym that writer Jan Huckins adopted for two crime novels written in the early 1950s. She was born in 1911 in Oklahoma City, where her parents owned the Huckins Hotel (her mother later jumped to her death from the 8th floor in 1949). She wrote freelance articles for newspapers and magazines and ghost-wrote the scripts (for writer Irma Phillips) for the popular 1942 radio serial Lonely Woman, which she also novelized. In 1959, she co-authored the novel “Face of My Assassin” under her own name with Carolyn Weston. Huckins died in Santa Monica, California in 1981.

FACE OF MY ASSASSIN by Jan Huckins & Carolyn Weston

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A lost literary classic, back-in-print for the first time in 60 YEARS, a powerful novel in the tradition of IN THE HEAT OF THE NIGHT and TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD

It’s 1959. Matthew Scott is a widowed, alcoholic reporter from New York who seeks personal and professional redemption when he’s sent to the Deep South to write about a town that is defying a U.S. Supreme Court decision to integrate blacks into schools. His mere presence is a catalyst that ignites long-buried racial, political, religious, and personal conflicts among the residents, both white and black, ripping the town apart. Those tensions violently explode when Scott is falsely arrested by the bigoted, tyrannical sheriff for the rape and murder of an out-spoken black schoolteacher.

This is a stunning, shockingly vivid portrait of a dark time in America’s history, a tale of intolerance, bigotry and hope that’s as relevant today as it was sixty years ago…

Praise for FACE OF MY ASSASSIN:

“At sixty-one years distance it’s hard not to read this novel for the remarkable social document it is, for what it says about segregation in the 1950s. The issues Face of My Assassin raises are sometimes brutal and obvious but there’s a lot of subtly here too. As integration is coming to the fore this novel explores prejudice in all its forms –institutional, paternalistic, unconscious — but also the possibility of change and the way people see their own racism. It’s a powerful piece of writing.” NB Magazine UK

“Jan Huckins and Carolyn Weston have a true ear for Southern speech, a sharp eye for Southern style, and an acute feeling for the South…they have treated eloquently a significant segment of the current Southern tragedy in perhaps the only way the sad tale can be told — as fiction with a heavy beat of melodrama.” Arkansas Gazette

“A vivid portrait of a community…the book’s detail is surprisingly sharp. The authors have told a moving story filled with passion and pathos, and a little joy. The final effect is a telling denunciation of racial prejudice.” Arizona Daily Star

“An exciting melodrama dealing with integration in the South…a thorough examination of southern racial attitudes. The book has the power to move and enlighten reader.” Los Angeles Times

“Written in a smooth, expert style, [with] a plot that outdoes Faulkner in imagination.” Dan Wakefield, The Saturday Review

“An exciting novel and one valuable because of its sociological meaning.” Lincoln Journal-Star

“This intense novel will hold your interest and send you racing from page to page as you observe an almost imperceptible change in a bigoted small town. The characters vibrate with life and make this novel one of the most vital of the year.” Napa Valley Star

“A romantinc-realistic novel about the present-day South. This is an especially thought-provoking novel, sympathetic to black and white, and written with admirable objectivity.” Pittsburgh Courier

“They write with indignation and authority, with urgency and verve.. [the book] has something significant to say and tells its story with pace and narrative skill.” Rocky Mountain Telegraph

“While the novel is good melodrama, one may hope that it is also true prophecy. Face of My Assassin makes good reading and has the additional value of suggesting that the problem of segregation-integration issue is not so much that the Southern people have unenlightened opinions as that many of them are too lethargic to stand up and be counted as enlightened ones.” MANAS Journal, Explorations in Ethical Thought