Cutting Edge Books: Authors

A.C. Abbott

A.C. Abbott

A.C. Abbott was the pseudonym of Helen Abbott Meinzer, who wrote 70 stories for western pulps in the 1930s and 40s, and died in 1963 in her mid-forties. She only wrote two novels, Wild Blood and Branded, both of which have been reissued by Cutting Edge.

Tom Ardies

Tom Ardies

Tom Ardies was a reporter and columnist for the Vancouver Sun during the 1960’s, a thriller novelist in the 1970s & 80s, and an acclaimed crime writer (under the pseudonym “Jack Trolley”) in the 1990s. His spy novel Kosygin Is Coming was adapted into the movie called Russian Roulette starring George Segal and Denholm Elliott. He died in 2020 at the age of 89.

Burt Arthur

Burt Arthur

Burt Arthur (1899-1975) wrote over a hundred western novels and was reportedly one of President Dwight D. Eisenhower’s favorite authors. He is perhaps best known for his novel The Texan, which was filmed three times and became a 1958 television series starring Rory Calhoun. He also collaborated for many years with his son, Budd.

 

 

Marcy Bachmann

Marcy Bachmann

Marcy Bachmann has been a writer in the San Francisco Bay Area for most of her adult life, as a journalist, syndicated relationship columnist and opinion and commentary columnist. Her freelance pieces have appeared in numerous magazines and she has taught writing classes to inmates of the federal prison system.

Ledru Baker Jr.

Ledru Baker Jr.

Very little is known about Ledru Shoopman Baker (1919-1967), who wrote only four novels and one novella in his short career. His 1957 novella The Queen’s Bedroom was performed on an LP by Boris Karloff and his novel The Cheaters was adapted into the 1990 Canadian TV movie Frame Up Blues aka Le Danse du Scorpion. He died in Long Beach, California at age 48 in 1967.

James Warner Bellah

James Warner Bellah

James Warner Bellah (1899-1976) was a journalist, WW1 fighter pilot, author and screenwriter. He wrote 19 novels, but is perhaps best known for his screenplays, which include Ten Tall Men, Rio Grande, The Sea Chase, Sergeant Rutledge & The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance.

Jim Bosworth

Jim Bosworth

Jim Bosworth aka Allan Bernard Bosworth aka J. Allan Bosworth (1925-1990) was a reporter for the San Francisco Chronicle who left journalism to write novels. He wrote his first two novels—Speed Demon and The Long Way North—as Jim Bosworth before hitting his stride writing seven acclaimed young adult novels under the name J. Allan Bosworth.

Carse Boyd

Carse Boyd

“Carse Boyd” was a pseudonym for David Derek Stacton (1923-1968), an acclaimed American poet and author, under various names, of literary fiction, historical novels, and soft-core gay porn. His work ranged from lurid tales like D is for Delinquent to a non-fiction book about the fall of Constantinople. He died in Denmark in 1968.

Sloane Britain

Sloane Britain

Sloane Britain aka Sloan Britton was the pseudonym of Elaine Williams, aka Elaine H. Cumming (1932-1963), who was an editor at Midwood-Tower and a ground-breaking author of lesbian pulp fiction. She was killed in a car accident in Red Hook, NY on December 23, 1963, after attending a party. She left behind behind a husband and four children.

Joseph L. Chadwick

Joseph L. Chadwick

Joseph L. Chadwick (1909-1987) wrote under a number of pseudonyms (including “Jack Barton”) in a wide variety of genres, penning 200 short stories, 135 novels, and four non-fiction books about history in his lifetime.

Bud Clifton

Bud Clifton

“Bud Clifton” was a pseudonym for David Derek Stacton (1923-1968), an acclaimed American poet and author, under various names, of literary fiction, historical novels, and soft-core gay porn. His work ranged from lurid tales like D is for Delinquent to a non-fiction book about the fall of Constantinople.

Lillian Colter

Lillian Colter

Nothing is known about “Lillian Colter.” She doesn’t seem to have written a book before or since The Awakening of Jenny, nor did she do any interviews, leading some collectors to suspect “Lillian Colter” was a pseudonym for another author. Did she only write one bestseller, helping to launch a legendary imprint… and then disappear into obscurity? It’s a mystery.

Paul Connolly

Paul Connolly

Thomas Grey Wicker (1926-2011) was a reporter whose column “The Nation” ran in the New York Times from 1966 through 1992. He also wrote three classic crime-noir paperback originals for Fawcett Gold Medal under the pseudonym “Paul Connolly” — Get Out of Town (1951), Tears Are for Angels (1952) and So Fair, So Evil (1955).

James Cross

James Cross

“James Cross” was the pseudonym of Hugh J. Parry (1916-1997), a career U.S. Information Agency officer who had a PhD in sociology, was fluent in many languages, and wrote novels in multiple genres, as well as book reviews and essays on foreign relations under his own name.

Jan Curran

Jan Curran

Jan Curran was a columnist and feature writer for the Contra Costa Times during the 1970s, worked as a publicist and advertising executive in the early 1980s, and began writing for Palm Springs Life magazine in 1985. She also was a feature writer and columnist for The Desert Sun. Curran was the mother of four children, including New York Times bestselling authors Lee Goldberg and Tod Goldberg.

Norman Daniels

Norman Daniels

Norman Daniels (real name Norman Danberg, 1905-1995)  was a prolific writer of pulps, radio dramas, TV shows, many paperbacks in a wide variety of genres, and many pseudonyms (like “Harrison Judd”),  including many romances published under his wife Dorothy’s name.

James Robert Daniels

James Robert Daniels

James Robert Daniels is an author, playwright, and has been a professional actor and director for over forty years. He was director of performance for the Western Michigan University Department of Theatre for twenty-five years and retired as professor emeritus, then taught for five years as a senior lecturer in acting at the University of Texas at Austin. Jim and his wife, Patricia, live in Austin, Texas.

Ovid Demaris

Ovid Demaris

Ovid Demaris (1919 –1998) was a newspaper reporter who wrote over a dozen pulp novels but hit the bestseller lists with a string of non-fiction books, primarily about organized crime, including The Last Mafioso and The Green Felt Jungle. Two of his novels became cult classic crime movies Machine Gun McCain (from Candyleg) and Gang War (from The Hoods Take Over).

Ralph Dennis

Ralph Dennis

Among crime writers, the late Ralph Dennis is considered a master of the genre who never received the recognition he deserved. He’s the author of the thirteen legendary Hardman novels, and six standalone thrillers, including A Talent For Killing, The War Heist, and Dust in the Heart. He died in 1988.

Robert Dietrich

Robert Dietrich

Robert Dietrich was a pseudonym for E. Howard Hunt, better known for his role in the Watergate scandal rather than for his great crime novels.

Allan Vaughan Elston

Allan Vaughan Elston

Allan Vaughan Elston (1887-1976) was an incredibly prolific author of western short stories and novels. His work also included episodes of the anthology TV series Alfred Hitchcock Presents and Schlitz Playhouse of the Stars.

Walter Gann

Walter Gann

Details on Walter Gann are hard to come by. But we know from the short bios in his two published books—the non-fiction Tread of the Longhorns and western The Trail Boss—that he was born in Texas and spent 35 years in the cattle industry as a “cowboy” before becoming a sheriff’s deputy and a special agent for the Union Pacific Railroad. He wrote many historical articles and western short stories.

Max Gareth

Max Gareth

“Max Gareth” was a pseudonym for author Stuart James.

Garrity

Garrity

Garrity aka David J. Garrity aka David J. Gerrity (1923-1984) was in the Merchant Marines and, without giving up his day job, wrote his first two novels, Kiss Off the Dead and Cry Me a Killer, in a style and voice very similar to Mickey Spillane, his good friend and mentor.

Lee Gifford

Lee Gifford

Lee Gifford was a pseudonym for Maurice Lee Gifford (1922-2006). He was born in Libertyville, Illinois and died in Prescott, AZ in 2006. He worked as a purchasing manager for Oscar Mayer in Madison, WI, Rohr Aircraft in Riverside, CA, and finally C. Brewer & Co. in Hilo, HI. Pieces of the Game was his only novel.

Lee Goldberg

Lee Goldberg

Lee Goldberg writes books and television shows. He published his first book .357 Vigilante (as “Ian Ludlow,” so he’d be on the shelf next to Robert Ludlum) while he was still a UCLA student. His many subsequent books include the non-fiction Successful Television Writing and Unsold Television Pilots as well as the bestselling Eve Ronin and Ian Ludlow series.

Chalmers Green

Chalmers Green

Chalmers Green is a mystery. Nothing is known about him and he appears to have written only one terrific novel, The Scarlet Venus, in 1952. The general consensus among crime fiction fans and collectors is that it’s a pseudonym.

E.E. Halleran

E.E. Halleran

Eugene E. Halleran (1905-1994), who also wrote as “Eran Hall,” was an English, math and history teacher who became a prolific author of over a dozen westerns and short stories.

Tom Harland

Tom Harland

“Tom Harland” was a pseudonym for one or more authors writing sexy pulp novels in the late 1950s and early 1960s.

C. William Harrison

C. William Harrison

C. William Harrison (1913-1994) aka Chester William Harrison aka Coe Williams aka Will Hickok is purported to have written hundreds of novels and several non-fiction books under his various names. One of his books became the 1957 movie The Guns of Fort Petticoat, which he also novelised. He also wrote tie-ins for the TV series The Restless Gun.

 

March Hastings

March Hastings

“March Hastings” was one of the pseudonyms (along with Laura Duchamp, Viveca Ives, and Alden Stowe) of Sally M. Singer, a lesbian writer born in 1930s and the author of more than 130 novels, across many genres.

Richard Himmel

Richard Himmel

Throughout the 1950s, Richard Himmel worked by day as an interior designer and at night as a successful writer of paperback original crime novels. His first book, I’ll Find You, was a massive, multi-million copy bestseller that almost single-handedly put Fawcett Crest’s famed Gold Medal Paperbacks on the literary map.

James Howard

James Howard

James Arch Howard (1922-2000) earned a doctorate in psychology at UCLA and wrote novels to pay his tuition. His four book series about journalist “Steve Ashe” was an immediate hit, selling over 600,000 copies. Altogether, he wrote ten novels (one under the pseudonym “Laine Fisher”), eight published from 1954-1961, and two more in 1980-81.

Jan Huckins

Jan Huckins

Jan Huckins was born in 1911 in Oklahoma City. She wrote freelance articles for newspapers and magazines and ghost-wrote the scripts (for writer Irma Phillips) for the popular 1942 radio serial Lonely Woman, which she also novelized. In 1959, she co-authored the novel Face of My Assassin under her own name with Carolyn Weston. Huckins died in Santa Monica, California in 1981.

Warner Jackson

Warner Jackson

Warner Jackson aka W. Warner Jackson was an African-American, Kansas City-based author of three novels: The Birth of Martyr’s Ghost (1957), Lust for Youth (1960) and Cavern of Rage (1961).

Stuart James

Stuart James

Stuart James (1923-??) grew up in rural Pennsylvania and at 15 went to work as a sports reporter for the Delaware Valley Advance.  In 1992, the year of his last known published book, he was making his home between residences in Greenwich, Connecticut, and Cedar Key, Florida. 

Hilda Lawrence

Hilda Lawrence

Hilda Lawrence (1906-76) published her first book, Blood upon the Snow, in 1944. Her other books include A Time to Die, Death of a Doll, The Pavilion and the novellas The House and Composition for Four Hands.

Paul Evan Lehman

Paul Evan Lehman

Paul Evan Lehman (1895-1961) wrote more than 50 westerns, two of which were made into the movies The Idaho Kid and Gunsmoke (not to be confused with the unrelated TV series of the same name).

Louis Lorraine

Louis Lorraine

Louis Lorraine was the author of Commuter Widow, The Cheating Game, Reckless Wives and The Split-Level Game, among many other sizzling novels of suburban angst and physical yearning.

Robert McCaig

Robert McCaig

Robert J. McCaig (1904-1982) was a writer from Great Falls, Montana who wrote numerous westerns, including Wild Justice, Toll Mountain, The Burnt Wood Men, Danger West, and Haywire Town and served as President of the Western Writers of America in 1975-76.

Lee Morell

Lee Morell

“Lee Morell” was a pseudonym for an author of two classic lesbian pulp novels—Mimi (1959) and Nurses’ Quarters (1960).

William Bryon Mowery

William Bryon Mowery

William Byron Mowery (1899-1957) wrote over 450 short stories and serialized novels and was often referred to as the “Zane Grey of the Canadian Northwest.” He was also a renowned creative writing instructor who taught at various universities. One of his most famous students was internationally bestselling author Mary Higgins Clark.

Sterling Noel

Sterling Noel

Sterling Noel (1903-1984) was an American author and journalist who wrote a handful of pulp and espionage novels, including the then controversial “near future” thriller I See Red and a post-apocalyptic, science-fiction tale We Who Survived. His novel Intrigue in Paris (aka Storm Over Paris) became the 1956 movie Triple Deception (aka House of Secrets).

E.M. Parsons

E.M. Parsons

Elmer Merle Parsons was born in Pittsburgh, PA, in 1926. In 1955, he was arrested in Pasadena, CA for passing 22 stolen checks. He was sentenced to five years in prison, which he served at San Quentin, where he became editor of the prison newspaper and sold his first novel, Self Made Widow, to Fawcett for a $3500 advance under the pen-name “Philip Race.”

John B. Prescott

John B. Prescott

John B. Prescott (1919-1999) was the author of several westerns, including the 1954 Spur Award winning novel Journey by the River.

Philip Race

Philip Race

Elmer Merle Parsons was born in Pittsburgh, PA, in 1926. In 1955, he was arrested in Pasadena, CA, for passing 22 stolen checks. He was sentenced to five years in prison, which he served at San Quentin, where he became editor of the prison newspaper and sold his first novel, Self Made Widow, to Fawcett for a $3500 advance under the pen-name “Philip Race.”

William MacLeod Raine

William MacLeod Raine

William MacLeod Raine (1875-1954) was the author of dozens of western novels and short stories, as well as non-fiction, a list of literary achievement that earned him a posthumous induction into the Hall of Great Westerners of the National Cowboy and Western Heritage Museum in 1959. Many of his novels were adapted into movies during the silent film era.

Roe Richmond

Roe Richmond

Roaldus “Roe” Richmond (1910-1986) was a prolific western author. His many novels include The Wild Breed, Montana Bad Man, Death Rides the Dondrino, Crusade on the Chisholm, Mojave Gun, Lash of Idaho, the Lashtrow series and a novelization of the Henry Fonda TV series The Deputy.

Randy Salem

Randy Salem

“Randy Salem” was the pseudonym for Pat Purdue, a major name in lesbian pulp fiction… and the longtime lover of Sally Singer, also a prolific author of lesbian pulp fiction under the pseudonym “March Hastings.” Salem’s other ground-breaking books include Chris, Tender Torment, The Unfortunate Flesh, The Soft Sin, and The Sex Between.

Les Savage

Les Savage

Leslie “Les” Savage Jr. (1922-1958) wrote nearly a hundred short stories and two-dozen novels under his own name and various pseudonyms (including “Logan Stewart”).

Don Smith

Don Smith

Don Smith (1909-1978) aka Donald Taylor Smith was a Canadian-born author best known for his 21-book Secret Mission series of espionage adventures.

Bart Spicer

Bart Spicer

Bart Spicer aka Albert Samuel Spicer (1918-1978) was the author of two dozen novels in multiple genres, including crime, thriller and historical sagas. He is perhaps best known for his series of seven “Carney Wilde” private eye novels in the 1950s. As “Jay Barbette,” he teamed up to write four novels with his wife, Betty Coe Spicer, a well-known magazine editor.

Henry Steig

Henry Steig

Henry Steig (1906-1973) was a man of many talents. He was a jazz musician, author, sculptor, journalist, commercial artist, screenwriter, cartoonist (as “Henry Anton”), painter, and a renowned jewelry maker with his own shops in New York City and Provincetown, Massachusetts. Send Me Down was his only novel.

John B. Thompson

John B. Thompson

Louisiana native and WW2 veteran John Burton Thompson (1911-1994) authored and sold around 75 books under his own name, and many others under pseudonyms.

Mark Tryon

Mark Tryon

“Mark Tryon” was a pseudonym for one or more authors writing sexy pulp novels for a number of publishers in the 1950s and early 1960s. His name is particularly notorious, however, because his novel Twisted Love was banned for being indecent. Sales of the book led to the arrest of a California bookseller and the landmark 1959 Supreme Court case Smith v. California.

Geoffrey Wagner

Geoffrey Wagner

Geoffrey Wagner (1919-2006) was an English professor, radio commentator, journalist, the author of a dozen novels, three poetry collections, as well as non-fiction books on a range of subjects, including travel guides and literary and film criticism. His 1962 spanking-fetish novel The Lake Lovers, heavily edited in its day, was revised and republished in 1994 as A Singular Passion.

Charles Warren

Charles Warren

Charles Marquis Warren (1912-1990) was a famous and incredibly prolific Hollywood writer, producer and director, primarily of westerns, whose many credits include the movies Mutiny on the Bounty, Streets of Laredo, Pony Express, Top Hat and Charro! His television credits include writing and producing the early years of Gunsmoke, The Virginian, and Rawhide.

Robert Wernick

Robert Wernick

Robert Wernick (1918-2014) was born in Boston, graduated from Harvard, and became a Paris-based journalist for the International Herald TribuneTime Magazine, Saturday Evening Post, Smithsonian Magazine, Life, Vanity Fair, and Harper’s Bazaar, among many others publications. He wrote five novels, including The Freebooters and The Hill of Fortune.

Tom West

Tom West

Fred East (1885-1983), who wrote under the name “Tom West,” was born in London, England. After being badly injured in France while serving in the British Army in WW1, he turned to writing, eventually moving to the United States, where he became a journalist and editor. In 1944, at age 59, he published his first western novel, and went on to write 60 more, including some under pseudonyms.

Carolyn Weston

Carolyn Weston

Carolyn Weston is the author of the three, ground-breaking police procedurals that became the hit TV series The Streets of San Francisco.

 

Robert Wilder

Robert Wilder

Robert Wilder (1901-1974) was an ex-newspaper reporter whose blockbuster novels include Written on the Wind and Flamingo Road, which both became classic movies. Flamingo Road was also a hit play and was adapted into a short-lived, 1980s TV series.