ROOT OF EVIL by James Cross (Hugh J. Parry)

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An Edgar Award Winner for Best First Novel

Jim McCabe was just another ex-GI trying to scribble a living as a writer in Hollywood until he discovers a chest of century-old gold coins buried in his backyard…and decides to keep it, smuggle the coins to Europe, and sell them for a fortune. But there are plenty of people who want to take his treasure from him and are willing to kill the people he loves to do it in this chilling tale of lust, greed and murder..

“A fast-paced, hot-breathing tale…amazingly credible.” Bestseller Magazine

“Vividly realistic.” Sydney Morning Herald

“Thrilling, mystifying and suspenseful to the very end.” New York Morning Telegraph

“A tough thriller that starts on a hot California afternoon and ends in a savage, sadistic grudge fight in a ruined castle on the Rhine.” The Observer (London)

“Six deaths and a great deal of anguish provide the title as well as a read-it-at-one-sitting chiller.” Fort Worth Star-Telegram

“A fast-moving tale of intrigue, murder and extortion told in a snappy, hardboiled style.”Pulpetti

“James Cross” was the pseudonym of Hugh J. Parry (1916-1997), a career U.S. Information Agency officer who had a PhD in sociology, was fluent in many languages, and wrote novels in multiple genres…as well as book reviews and essays on foreign relations under his own name.

PIECES OF THE GAME by Lee Gifford

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“This novel kicks total ass. Pieces of the Game is like a deep-water, Clive Cussler treasure hunt crossed with “The Great Escape” with enough intrigue and action to rival both.” Paperback Warrior

Shortly before the U.S. and Filipino forces surrendered to the Japanese on May 6, 1942, they dumped all of Manilla’s silver pesos, valued at $8 million, into the deep water south of Caballo Bay. The Japanese want the fortune, so they force seven American POWs to dive into the cold depths to help recover it…or face torture and death. One man survives to tell the tale…but that harrowing adventure is only the prelude to the rest of his story, set long after the war is over, when he returns to Manilla to face an old enemy.

“Lee Gifford’s strength lies in his ability to tell an epic story. Pieces of the Game was like this grand cinematic experience. The opening events that eventually spills into a high-adventure military tale felt as if they were backed by a rich symphonic score.” The Paperback Warrior

I HAVE GLORIA KIRBY by Richard Himmel

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Johnny Maguire is back in his third adventure — a hurricane of guys, gals and guns

The wife of the biggest mob boss in town walks into Johnny’s office with a suitcase full of stolen cash and asks for his help. She’s also Johnny’s first love, the woman who ripped out his heart ten years ago. He knows he should say no…but he can’t stop himself.

TERROR IN THE NIGHT by Sebastian Blayne (Jan Huckins)

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“A tense, psychological novel of suspense, written in a brittle, sophisticated manner that will keep the reader in a state of fascination.” Pensacola News-Journal

Sebastian “Neddy” Blayne is a flamboyant, wealthy, pampered bon vivant… famous playwright, author and a brilliant detective. Blayne is equal parts Nero Wolfe, Simon Templar and Hercule Poirot…and he is aided in his adventures by his bald, Italian valet Beppo, his red-headed secretary Maggie, and his French poodle Misty…and the ever-diligent NYPD homicide detective Simon Fennelley.

But his latest case hits very close to home.

Memo from Maggie to Sebastian Blayne: “I’m going back. I guess I’m too ‘lace curtain Irish stubborn’ to be scared off. You say I have bride’s jitters, but Neddy, I know someone in the dowager house means to kill me. The town will be filled with terror for me and I’ll dread the streets at night. I only hope my murderer isn’t Curt, because that would mean I’m marrying a psychopath. Remember how we used to drink Courvoisier out of the toothbrush glass? Will you miss me Neddy? Your loving secretary, Maggie.”

Is Blayne’s secretary marrying a psychopathic killer? Will Blayne find the answer before she’s dead…or will he be killed first? To find the answer, he will have to face the terror in the night.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

“Sebastian Blayne” was the pseudonym that writer Jan Huckins adopted for two crime novels written in the early 1950s. She was born in 1911 in Oklahoma City, where her parents owned the Huckins Hotel (her mother later jumped to her death from the 8th floor in 1949). She wrote freelance articles for newspapers and magazines and ghost-wrote the scripts (for writer Irma Phillips) for the popular 1942 radio serial Lonely Woman, which she also novelized. In 1959, she co-authored the novel “Face of My Assassin” under her own name with Carolyn Weston. Huckins died in Santa Monica, California in 1981.

THE CHINESE KEYHOLE by Richard Himmel

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Was the big blonde a willing victim to the sadist with the whip, or did she hold the key to the Communist spyring? Johnny had to know.

Johnny Maguire hadn’t visited Chinatown in a long time, and now he wasn’t there for the tourist attactions. Not that the Chinese Keyhole didn’t have plenty to offer -if you liked that sort of thin. Behind its pseudo-Oriental facade, the strip-club provided unusual entertainment for its off-beat clientele…and the performers were weirder than those who paid to watch them. There was the statuesque blonde dancer for instance. She left nothing to the imagination of her audience, and she was beautiful: but she just wasn’t Johnny’s type. And he wasn’t crazy about her partner, either-the muscular but mincing ballet dancer who carried a vicious-looking whip and didn’t hesitate to use it.

But it was all in a day’s work . Somewhere amongst the lust, sadism, and brutality there was the key to a Communist spy ring. And Johnny had to find it…

THE CALYPSO CAPER by Robert Dietrich (E. Howard Hunt)

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Steve Bentley travels to the Virgin Islands, a tropical paradise where the weather is hot and the women are hotter…and life is murder…in his seventh action-packed adventure

An old Cha-Cha fisherman find the naked body of ex-casino boss Victor Polo floating off the Frenchtown docks and brings his corpse back to town. By noon, a Calypso band had penned a tune for poor Victor…and soon everybody on the island knew the words:

Mistah Victor Polo was a Big Time Man
He gable for money where
evah he can
Win lotta money, then lose it, too.
Mistah Victor Polo, he all through…..

But nobody knew why Victor Polo had come back to St. Thomas… or why he had been killed. And not many people cared. Only the Virgin Islands Police. The Murderer. And Polo’s old friend… Steve Bentley

“A solid potboiler… it’s got enough stylistic flair, high-octane twists, and layered mystery that make it a perfect page-turner. Hunt’s execution is enjoyable; his prose is superb at times, reminding you that he beat out Gore Vidal and Truman Capote to win a Guggenheim Fellowship. It’s the kind of book that really grows on you, with the depth and complexity of the murder-mystery plot drawing you in.” Battered, Tattered, Yellowed And Creased

“Steve Bentley [is] series fiction’s toughest tax accountant.” Bill Pronzini & Marcia Muller, 1001 Midnights, The Afficionado’s Guide to Detective Fiction

“As ‘Robert Dietrich,’ E. Howard Hunt wrote ten novels starring Steve Bentley, a Washington D.C. accountant who solves murders in private-eye style. The first thing to know about Bentley is that he isn’t just a paper-pushing CPA. He’s a Korean War veteran who was employed at one time by the U.S. Treasury Department. If you love vintage crime-fiction you should enjoy this tale.” The Paperback Warrior

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Robert Dietrich was a pseudonym for E. Howard Hunt, better known for his role in the Watergate scandal rather than for his great crime novels. Gore Vidal wrote this about “Robert Dietrich” in The New York Times: “In 1957, H.H. gave birth to ‘Robert Dietrich.’ who specialized in thrillers, featuring Steve Bentley, formerly of the CID and now a tax consultant. H.H. plainly enjoys composing plausible (and implausible) biographies for his characters—not to mention for himself. In Contemporary Authors, H.H. composed a bio for his pseudonym Robert Dietrich, taking ten years off his age, putting himself in the infantry during Korea, awarding himself a Bronze Star and a degree from Georgetown.”

HOLIDAY IN HELL by Sebastian Blayne (Jan Huckins)

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Someone wants Moira dead but each horrific attempt, each apparent “accident,” has failed so far…and cost others their lives. But she knows that soon her luck will run out…and the killer, who might even be her own husband, will succeed.

Her only hope was Sebastian Blayne…the flamboyant, wealthy, pampered bon vivant… famous playwright, author and brilliant detective. Blayne is equal parts Nero Wolfe, Simon Templar and Hercule Poirot…and he is aided in his adventures by his bald, Italian valet Beppo, his red-headed secretary Maggie, and his French poodle Misty…and the ever-diligent NYPD homicide detective Simon Fennelley.

This was previously published under the title Gay Ghastly Holiday

“Sebastian Blayne” was the pseudonym for writer Jan Huckins adopted for two crime novels written in the early 1950s. She was born in 1911 in Oklahoma City, where her parents owned the Huckins Hotel (her mother later jumped to her death from the 8th floor in 1949). She wrote freelance articles for newspapers and magazines and ghost-wrote the scripts (for writer Irma Phillips) for the popular 1942 radio serial Lonely Woman, which she also novelized. In 1959, she co-authored the novel “Face of My Assassin” under her own name with Carolyn Weston. Huckins died in Santa Monica, California in 1981.